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We’re now officially two weeks old, here on Sphinn -- and I’m bringing on some people to help me review stories and moderate, to keep things running smoothly. I started to write up some notes to explain to them all about what I’ve been doing to try and keep Sphinn a positive experience, with lots of good content. Then I thought -- hey! -- I should just share this with everyone. So read along for my thoughts, which I hope will help the community itself improve things or give you the chance to share input if you’re concerned about something.
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from dannysullivan 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Moderating and managing Sphinn has taken a bit of a mindshift from traditional forum thinking. I watched over the Search Engine Watch Forums for about two years, and here’s what I’d say the big issues were there (and perhaps true of other forums). (1) Drive By, Off-Topic Spam Posts: There’s no end to people who want to tell you they have Nike shoes for sale at cheap prices and flood your forum with spam. (2) Irrelevant Link Drops: If making threads isn’t enough, how about dropping irrelevant links into the middle of discussions (3) Fighting: Things get heated, so you have to play referee when people can’t control themselves (4) Editor: It’s easy for multiple threads on the same topic to start, and merging them is often useful and makes for better content. People also often don’t describe discussion topics well, which mean it’s useful to retitle things. Finally, most forums don’t automatically feature key discussions. At SEWF or at WebmasterWorld, someone has to manually decide to feature some key threads. So far, 1 is somewhat the biggest issue here, and it hasn’t been that bad. Knock wood, of course. I’ve had to kill a few things completely off-topic, plus there were a couple of people who have tried to flood us, but it’s been far better than I could have hoped. As for 2 and 3, folks haven’t been fighting but rather amazingly interacting through comments. And comments themselves haven’t had a ton of bad link drops. Being editor is most fascinating for me. I don’t have to pick what stories to feature. The voting, the sphinning, while not perfect -- works pretty well. I’ve been thrilled with the stories that have made it to the home page. True, the story selection is a bit heavy on stories about Sphinn itself. But that reflects some enthusiasm about the new site among those getting comfortable here, as well as discussion on how it should go forward. There have been plenty of non-Sphinn stories, as well. So after two weeks, these are what I see as the main challenges in editing and moderating Sphinn: (A) Keeping What’s New Compelling: There’s a lot of mediocre stuff coming in. Sorry, but it’s true. Lots of great stuff, of course. The good news is that the voting is working well. We’ve got a savvy audience here, and if you’re not putting out super content for them to look at, they won’t vote. That helps protect the more popularly viewed home page. However, it’s annoying if submissions ramp up and What’s New started to be so full of noise that the signal can’t be spotted and voted out front. (B) Editing Titles: Related to above, topics will live or die by their titles, sometimes. I’ve been doing things to help improve some of them, and we’ll likely do more of that, plus ask for your help as well. These challenges may change over time. We might see people heavily try to game the voting system, start to do comment link drops or things I can’t even think of. But that’s where I see things standing now. From there, I’d like to describe what my moderating day is like. This is to help guide those who will be starting to help me, plus I think it will be useful to any Sphinn member to understand stuff that’s going to keep you out of trouble and hopefully help you go popular. What’s New & Discards -- Being Pulled From What’s New I’m watching What’s New like a mother hen. I’m refreshing it constantly to see what’s flowing in. Within Firefox, I tend to open up a new tab both for the story being referenced and the topic at Sphinn. My first review is to see whether something’s on topic. The news guidelines (see them via here: http://sphinn.com/help-info.php) cover what’s acceptable. If it’s off-topic, it’s going to be what’s called internally as Discard. When I do this, I’m usually putting a comment right in the topic that’s pulled saying that it has been removed from What’s New. The easiest way to see me doing this is to watch the comments area (http://sphinn.com/comments). FYI, a comments feed will be coming later today. A discard is pretty much like a bury over at Digg. If it happens to your story, no one will see it unless they know exactly where to go (and eventually, it’s going to change that the topic page itself will disappear entirely). It can’t get Sphinns, and it will never reach the Hot Topics page. Discards aren’t done lightly, but they are done. As I said, right now we’re commenting publicly when discards happen. While it’s often a good rule that moderation shouldn’t be done publicly (especially espoused by Brett Tabke over at WebmasterWorld), I’m deliberately breaking that rule a lot here. The reason is that I want to educate the community about why things are happening. My hope is that this type of communication will be reinforcing -- that people will just start naturally doing stuff in a way that’s better for everyone. It’s also in part because the Pligg software we use needs many more moderation features. If I discard your story, to tell you privately, I ironically have to stalk you to send email! Too many steps -- I’ll just leave a comment. In the future, discards will shift to private notification, and then only if we feel warranted. If someone comes along and knowingly spam us with a ton of off-topic stuff, we’re not going to bother with a warning or even to say why we pulled something. Those spammers (I joke before we could call them sphinncters) know why they were pulled. Email communication is just a waste of time. If someone does something that’s probably one-time stupid, then we might start to discard and drop a private note, in the future. The purpose here is to let them know how to correct behavior without giving the bad topics more attention (since commenting in it then makes it show up in the comments area). In some cases, we’ll continue to publicly comment. For example, I pulled a story today because the link was broken. In the past, I’ve pulled a story after we had already two or three on the same topic go hot. In another case, two people submitted on the same topic within minutes of each other, and it made sense to filter out one of them. Publicly commenting of this was helpful, to me, so that everyone understood why something that might have seemed fine suddenly went away. Better Titles After reviewing to remove completely off-topic stuff, I next really look at the titles of what’s come in. The biggest issue are blog names in titles, and I lay the blame squarely at the feet of WordPress, which seems to think I really want to know the name of your blog on every page you author. Generally, I don’t. Generally, I find it distracting. Maybe others don’t, but I think I’m on the mark here. So if I see a story that I think might go Hot, I may go in and edit out the blog name. That’s not to give the blog less exposure. It’s the opposite -- it’s to ensure people don’t dismiss the content because they’ve had to first read a title that says something like "Top Blog For Real Estate & Vacation Homes > 15 Ways To Attract Vistiors." In a few other cases, I see a title that I simply don’t think communicates the topic well. In those cases, I also make an alteration. I usually leave a public comment when I do this, as part of the overall education process. In the future, these might shift to private notification. So far, no one has complained about the changes like this. Freak you out? How about this. Totally disagree? You have the control to edit a title back to what you want. Feel free to go back in unless it has been a blog name removal. Right now, I’m holding my ground that losing those is a good thing, not bad. Disagree? Comment below. Agree? Then help -- please drop them when you submit. Please. Duplicate Content Another thing on my review hit list is duplicate content. No, not the let’s freak out with Google type of duplicate content. A story happens, and then we get multiple people who all submit on the same topic. While Andy Beard and I have discussed split attention, and how I don’t think it’s so bad -- I do think it can be an issue here. Right now, I’m sort of letting the votes sort it out. If two people want to post on a story, I’ll watch the votes and the comments. If one story takes off, I *might* discard the other but crosslink over to it. More likely, they’ll both go. I know we need better tools to help. Right now, we’ll tell you if a story from a particular site has already been submitted. We won’t tell you that story from another site has gone out. That’s why Matt Cutts talking about hyphens versus underscores ended up here three times, I think -- there was a News.com story about it, along with several others. We will improve those tools down the line. Until then, I’d strongly encourage people to review the last stories on What’s New before doing the submit. Just quickly scan to see if the story is already there. If so? Then don’t submit unless you are one of the exceptional cases that I’ll come to next. Link To The Source This isn’t something we currently correct, simply because the right tools aren’t in place. But it’s related to the above, so I’ll mention it now. Link to the source content. The news guidelines cover this, but it needs repeating. If you read about something new happening, and you don’t have unique, extensive, exception content that somehow adds value, don’t make us walk through your blog to get to the news. Link to the news itself. Doing this ensures you become a member we pay more attention to, which means when you do have a good reason to link to yourself, we’re more likely to sphinn your stories. In the coming weeks, I plan to introduce a "Via" option, so that you can credit your own blog or whatever source used to originally find the news story (say you want to reward Techmeme, for example). When that’s up, I hope it will encourage more people to do direct linking. That’s the carrot. The stick is that the moderators might remove a link to your site and move it to the via area, if that seems appropriate. You can comment about this now, if you like -- but when we get the feature, I promise we’ll do a new thread talking about it and discussing how members and moderators should make use of it. So when do you go beyond the news, where you can take the link to yourself. That’s hard. When you do a one or two paragraph summary, you certainly don’t go beyond. When you find a unique angle, that’s much better. When you look at a story and document multiple angles and round-up various sources, even better. Remember the Duplicate Content thing above? Here’s another tip. If you’ve blogged on a topic already being discussed, it is perfectly fine to drop a link to your blog within the comments. The News Guidelines explain this. So maybe you don’t have a unique new angle, but you feel you have thoughts to share as well. Yes, you can link drop. But it had better be a good story with something unique being offered. You’ve all probably noticed that Related Links tab that doesn’t really seem to do much. In the future, I want to make this a more formal way for anyone to contribute links on a topic that’s in discussion. Wrong Category I do some light changes here. We have top level categories and ask people to choose the right sub-category within them. Amazingly, lots do. Not everyone, though. Eventually, we’ll make it impossible to submit to a top level category (that’s so the top level category doesn’t get overwhelmed). Occasionally, if I see a topic going hot, I’ll make sure to put it in the right place. By default, everything is in the Google category. I especially move stuff out of that category when I see that happen and into the right place. Again, future changes will solve this. In the meantime, mods can use your help with correct categorization. Too Many Submissions We really don’t want every story you’ve written on a particular day. We want stories you think are exceptional. Occasionally, we’ve had people do three or more stories from their sites all in a row. Usually, moderation here is simply a comment to "slow down," and that has worked. We’ll probably stick to that, for now. Down the line, we might make it so new members can’t submit more than one story per day until a period of time has passed or they’ve built some internal reputation. We’ll see. Right now, I chalk most of this down to enthusiasm than anything else. Old Content I’ll quote the news guidelines here: "Please don’t submit stories more than a few days old unless you feel they are of exceptional quality that have gone somehow unnoticed by the greater online community." So far, I’ve only been lightly moderating this. That will increase, especially if What’s New starts to get more noisy. Hey, I’m glad there’s this great thing that was written back in January 2007. But it’s not new, and Sphinn is largely focusing on stuff that’s looking forward. I’ve got 11 years worth of articles I’ve written. No one wants me dumping those all into Sphinn! Most of the older stuff coming in, I chalk up as with other things to general enthusiasm. People want to submit; they want to submit their own stuff, so they’ll look to see what they’ve got. But you don’t produce gems every day, so I think at first people are reaching too far back. We’ll stay fairly mellow here in the short term, not discarding stories but rather assuming they just won’t pull the Sphinn. Longer term, it’s an issue if What’s New gets too flooded. In that case, we might more selectively discard or communicate with particular members, if they’re just hitting us with archive material too much. Underwhelming Content As I said before, there’s a lot of so-so content being submitted. We’re not moderating this now. Instead, that’s where the sphinning is coming into play. Good stuff gets the sphinns, and I highly encourage trying out the "popular view of What’s New in addition to the default of seeing the latest. Here it is: http://sphinn.com/upcoming/mostpopular/ If you think What’s New is feeling noise, that view is fast way to filter it out. It shows you all the stories with the most sphinns in What’s New. Rather than moderation, this is really a place where member help is especially needed. Let me give some examples of underwhelming stories. Often, they are only two or three paragraphs long. Hey, occasionally a hot news tip might only take that amount of space. But generally, these aren’t stories that will cut it. But they take up time for people to review. Another thing I personally find underwhelming is a Top Pick Your Number List of tips of things everyone knows. OK, even I like the occasional reminder to things to do. But be creative and break out, because just shoving a number at the front of your headline isn’t going to guarantee success. Personally, I also find general advice far less compelling that stories that give a tip and then provide some specific examples. Sphinn Button Issues Just a look ahead here. We do have the Sphinn buttons that people can put on their sites. This means that someone other than yourself might submit stories that duplicate others on Sphinn or which aren’t particularly compelling. I understand this and am fairly mellow to it. In fact, I understand it well because in two or three weeks, all commenting at Search Engine Land will stop using the system there in preference to having discussions on Sphinn. So I don’t want to kill stories just because they might duplicate others or because they might not be the greatest content but still attracted a comment (comments here will flow back to the Search Engine Land story page, and we hope to have it rigged so that work the same other sites that want this). None of our stories will automatically be submitted (and stories we post on SEL don’t attract comments already), so that should help keep SEL from overwhelming Sphinn. But if more sites including us make use of buttons, then some of the issues I’ve outlined above become harder. For the moment, we’ll rely mostly on sphinn votes to deal with the issue. If What’s New does begin to feel to unmanageable, maybe we’ll find a way to show only things that have received two or more votes (the challenge here, of course, is if you don’t show everything somewhere, you can’t get the initial votes to begin with). It may also be that What’s New will evolve to only show things by default that have received votes from members who’ve participated for a period or time or earned enough reputation. Maybe you can set it to just show stuff that your friends are submitting. The main thing I’m stressing is that I understand that What’s New is a key area of the site under the most pressure, so it will likely evolve over time - and I’ll raise any major proposals for changing it to see what other people thing, before making final decisions. Member Buries Another look ahead. As I explained, Digg has a system where members can "bury" a story and knock it out of consideration, if enough think it is bad. We deliberately have not switched that on here. It might come, as the member base grows. It certainly will help to allow members to help police their own community. A key issue for me is whether you show what someone buries. That’s kind of ironic, in that I had a real issue with Digg not showing what people bury. But showing sphinns shows a positive view of someone -- you don’t get attacked personally because you voted for something. Maybe someone gets upset that you didn’t vote for them. But if you bury someone, you might attract some real anger. So I need to think about that more, and whether it might be a case that enough buries might trigger some automatic auction but that a moderator might still have to review. I don’t know -- but when and if we get to that point, I’ll open it up for a discussion. Comments Everything above covers my usual day (or hour by hour!) on Sphinn, watching over it. But after checking stories, I check comments. We added a new Comment tab to make this easier for everyone, and I’m astounded at the activity. Sphinners talk a lot to each other, for a new site. They also have interesting discussions about topics that might not have gone hot or went hot ages ago but still have people interested. For the most part, people are talking nicely to each other and not link spamming. FYI, eventually comments will go to nofollow to further discourage link spamming that sadly will come, though maybe we’ll find a way for members that are more trusted through time here or reputation built to have that removed. I’ll bring this issue back up, when we get to having the capability. Also, we’ll eventually make it so the comments page will let you jump right to a particular comment -- plus on the profile pages, it will be comments that show, not a list of stories where someone has commented. Search Engine Land Love Still with me? Everything above pretty much covers what I have to say in terms of content guidelines for the site, and I hope it has been useful. I wanted to address a side issue that Sugarrae raised with me, about whether being in Sphinn might mean you lose out on links Search Engine Land might give you. In particular, she was concerned about how Sphinn links have been included in our SearchCap newsletter, such as you can see here: http://searchengineland.com/070725-165217.php At the bottom, you’ll see "Hot Items From Sphinn," and within that, the first item is Newsflash: You’re Damn Right It’s a Popularity Contest (Sphinn), here: http://sphinn.com/story/1436 Now that topic leads back to her original article here: http://www.sugarrae.com/newsflash-youre-damn-right-its-a-popularity-contest/ Her concern (for herself and others) is whether being on Sphinn means that we’d list a Sphinn URL in the recap rather than the source URL. The short answer is that it depends. For example, we probably review 300 or more items found through feeds per day. I’m fairly ruthless in wiping out things that will make it into the SearchCap. They’ve got to strike me or Barry Schwartz as really deserving a link. What we think deserves a link might not match up with what others think. That was a key reason for starting Sphinn. It lets readers from Search Engine Land and Sphinn help say what they like. In some ways, it’s a second chance for stories. I know there are things I’ve axed today from the SearchCap that are on Sphinn. One of them might go hot, and if so, it makes it into the SearchCap. Also, there are several occasions where we ran a direct URL to a story in SearchCap, then later that story also was submitted to Sphinn, when Hot, then made it back into SearchCap again. Still, I understand the concerns, and I’m thinking more about what to do. What we’re doing with Sphinn right now in SearchCap has been fairly temporary -- let’s include some links to spread the word, but that might not be the final format. For example, you’ll see how we categorize links in SearchCap. I’m concerned that maybe the top Sphinn items should be in there. In addition, SearchCap remains an editorial product -- IE, it’s what Barry and I think makes the cut. Things might make the top of Sphinn that we still don’t think need to add to our already busting list of links. SearchCap also largely focuses on search marketing, while Sphinn goes beyond that. For the next few weeks (probably three or four), the Sphinn inclusion is likely to stay the same. I just don’t have the time to mess with that right now, especially when I do feel we’re pretty good about giving people direct links all over the place (some stories on Sphinn, for example, might spark us to do a regular post on SEL, which provides even more exposure). There are a number of other things we need to tidy up with Sphinn, and grabbing those top links at the end of the day works well enough. What I think we’ll do, if we’re going to keep including Sphinn links as a list in there, is likely see if we can configure an output so that the link goes to the source site, with a link to the Sphinn discussion next to it. So it might be like this: Top Items Found Through Sphinn + Your Great Article With Link Directly To It (@Sphinn) This way, the direct link concern goes away, plus those who want to see discussion of the article at Sphinn can also jump through. I can’t say this is perfect, but I will say if you can give me a bit more time, I’ll open up a further discussion about it and/or related issues when we’re ready to change out we output stuff. How’s It Going? I’m pretty exhausted in writing at this point, but I wanted to grab a few key things to share with you all. We just passed 1,400 members. We have about 1,500 unique visitors per day. You spend on average 10 minutes per day here on the site (that’s a lot!). Most of you look at the home page (20%), then What’s New (7%) and then Submit (3%). Nearly 75% of you use Firefox. Most of you get referred here by Search Engine Land, then SEOmoz, on a regular basis. However, the vast majority of you either come here directly or jump over from feed readers like Google Reader or Bloglines. Yesterday, we sent out nearly 900 clicks. The story for top 25 SEO blogs got nearly 100 of those, then the Link Building Blog picked up nearly 60, and First Page Fitness picked up 45 for telling us about the sports bra simulator. This week, we’re generally sending out 800-900 clicks in total. Today, we’ve sent out 345 clicks so far, with Pronet Advertising leading at 33, followed by Science Blogs at 23. We have had lots of discussion on whether only the "popular" blogs can succeed here or do well, or whether it will be only the same voices that are heard. I’ll simply end to see I’m honestly amazed and thrilled at the variety I’m seeing. I’m personally discovering sites and people I never heard of, and it’s great. I hope to see much more of that continue. Thank you everyone for taking part and building it up into something fun, entertaining and educational.

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from MattC 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Hey Danny, I did not get my email ?

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from lcubeweb 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Thanks for the post. Handy to know what can help us with our posts while not polluting the space with junk

Avatar Administrator
from dannysullivan 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Matt, your email?

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from MattC 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Yes, lol. When an email is sent to me, its becomes my mail. *sigh* This is why I only moderate on less traffic sites ;D

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from mikemurray 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

It looks like you’ve covered it all. If you haven’t, I hope people don’t get all hot and bothered about the little things. This endeavor has attracted some outstanding thinking on current info. Thanks for taking the time to elaborate here and keep watch on what’s coming in.

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from AndrewGirdwood 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Thanks for the write up! I find the birth of sphinn to be fascinating. Are there any plans to email users when a sphinn they’ve submitted has had a comment? More of a forum thing than a digg thing, I know, but I’ve noticed we’re not getting that many comments. I suspect as the site grows we’ll get more comments but I was wondering about intentions?

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from Eavesy 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Wow, great read, I think that not having the bury feature is a great idea, if I don’t like something I just wont vote for it, that’s the way it seems to work at Netscape very few things get sunk, if something is off-topic/duplicated/out of date then it should be deleted of course.

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from TannerC 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 0

I’m going to start making "I Heart Sphinn" buttons.

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from MiriamEllis 2612 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Wow, what an exhaustive post! Thank you, Danny, for making everyone feel so included in the step-by-step stuff you’re having to do make Sphinn work the way you need it to. What a task! Keep up the good work! Miriam

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from Ramkarthik 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Hey Danny, that was bigger than a normal blog post. Sphinn is really good. It has low traffic now which makes it special. Only good stories are taken to the front page. Now many of the Sphinners have indirect control over the stories which is at top. This is why we get targeted traffic once the story becomes hot. Thanks for such a wonderful space.

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from ANOnym 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 1

"Please don’t submit stories more than a few days old unless you feel they are of exceptional quality that have gone somehow unnoticed by the greater online community." The thing is that your desire only to have news goes against the grain with the community, as it appears. There is plenty of SEM content that is unnoticed - and some webmasters think their blogs have that, too. So, limiting the source to 3-4 days and repeatedly saying that you prefer news is not that very friendly. I am not sure who will win, either people following the news thing and leaving your site for others to submit great content, or you slacking off on the news direction. Yes, you do say that quality content gets accepted, but quality from whose point of view? Yours or the submitter? For example, solving this issue will partly solve the "What’s new" problem you are experiencing. That is, if you officially rephrase the guidelines to "Please submit any quality articles, posts, news, tools and other material. We’ll appreciate it, if you focus on the quality, not quantity, though.". Then people will still submit news anyway, because many people follow them, and you’ll get more quality content stories. That is, currently, you say that "Submit news, we like news", so people just submit the stuff they have posted in the 3-4 days period, which is below the average. Of course, it won’t kill the average content, but the general rule to remember, which you should know is that "whenever you limit someone on something, someone will find a way around, which will be even less desirable, than you were trying to prevent". The point is: let the people define what they submit, news or content, only encourage quality stuff and only leave the quality/quantity moderation, not post age. It’ll make moderation and submitting easier and it’ll help people to to judge what to keep (sphinn).

Avatar Administrator
from dannysullivan 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 1

As I said, I’ve got 11 years worth of great content from just me personally that I could flood Sphinn or any other site with. Others could do the same. So yes, unfortunately, we’re going to work with the constraint that you should focus on new content here since submissions really are for news and newish material. I’ll consider adding another bulletpoint encouraging people to submit good, quality content. I guess, of course, that was understood. Who thinks anyone wants junk submitted? :) But point taken, it might help. As for letting people define what they submit, I think that’s exactly what we are doing. Go back and read what I wrote. We’re only pulling in a very few cases for some very specific reasons. By and large, it is still left to the submitter and the sphinners to evaluate the content of what’s submitted. But in watching Sphinn, I’ve also outlined above why I think a lot of stories simply aren’t resonating with people here. I think a savvy member or marketer will look at the tips -- not to mention what’s making it out to the home page -- and tailor submissions to match.

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from todd 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Here’s what I think about the issue of old content... I am guilty of submitting old content myself, and like Danny said I think that it was more out of enthusiasm for the site than anything else. I think that as time goes on people are less likely to submit old stories - those really good stories will have already made it on here. And as a community of people, who are theoretically ahead of the curve in the search marketing world, we don’t want to see that old content. We’re looking for the new stuff that keeps us on our toes and helps us stay informed of new developments in our field. Those old posts will eventually become the "Greatest Hits" section of this site.

Avatar Administrator
from dannysullivan 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Exactly -- Greatest Hits should become a useful resource, especially when you drill into categories. Here’s an easy way to freshen old content. Make a list. If you give me a Link Building 101 list, then provide a rundown on a bunch of link building resources, especially perhaps with them dated or prioritized in some way, that’s a new effort, fresh content, useful for Sphinn plus nice content for your own blog. Lyndon did this for landing pages and went hot: http://sphinn.com/story/895

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from ANOnym 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Alright, you two have a point. However, instead of limiting content submission just because you can’t structure the site is not a viable solution. Having separate "Friends’ Submits" and "Friends Sphinns" lists would help a lot. Then again, it’ll boost stories submitted by people with largest profiles. I guess it is no use telling the patriarch of search what to do, indeed.

Avatar Administrator
from dannysullivan 2611 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Well, I said when we launched we were going to add a way for you to see what friends have submitted. And then I said in this post that again. And then I said in my response to you that we’ll do that. So for the fourth time, yes, we’ll come up with list like that because they will help. As for suggesting we’re somehow unable to structure the site right, I’ll give it one last go. The focus here is on new stuff that’s coming up. Part of Sphinn is a social *news* sharing site. So when you submit something that’s a few weeks old, it’s not news. That’s not a "structural" problem, any more than a TV news show has a structural problem for not showing you what happened six weeks ago. As I said, I think it’s mostly an issue of enthusiasm right now. As people come into the site and have fresh content, they’re going to want to put that forward. And yes, the friends lists will help. But you still want the general What’s New area to not be overwhelmed by old stuff, if you can help it, because new people coming in won’t have a good experience. More important for those submitting, if you’re not putting up good stuff, you’re likely to be left off a friends list, so your stuff will go unseen.

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