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Great list of interview questions for SEOs.
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from bigpond 2310 Days ago #
Votes: 3

Where’s "Can you drink your own body weight in beer"??

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from emanuelh 2309 Days ago #
Votes: -3

Absurd. The list was created as if SEO is a technical profession. It prepares you for interviews with employers, SEO workers or otherwise, who share this misconception and then, because the question is on the list, they’ll ask: If you’ve done 6 months of SEO for a site and yet there haven’t been any improvements, how would you go about diagnosing the problem?Or worse,  they might hire you and later ask you: You’ve done 6 months of SEO for our site and yet there haven’t been any improvements, how would you go about diagnosing the problem?So St0n3y , what’s the answer?

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from TheMadHat 2309 Days ago #
Votes: 1

You don’t think there is anything technical about SEO? The questions were leaning more heavily in that direction but it’s a combination of technical knowledge and marketing knowledge. Without both you may as well roll over and find a new profession.

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from emanuelh 2309 Days ago #
Votes: -2

There’s a lot of confusion on this subject. As I wrote in http://sphinn.com/story/18731 website design and development is indeed a pure technical profession but SEO is not. With this in mind I practice SEO for nine years. Anyway, how would you answer the question above technically?

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from St0n3y 2309 Days ago #
Votes: 1

emanuelh, SEO is a technical profession. But it is also an creative one. You say website design is technical (it is) but you don’t think there is a createive element in that? Good design requires being able to artistically implement the technical along with the user usability elements. SEO is no different. It must balance both technical and creative.Of course the good seo would have been diagnosing the proble long before the six months, it should be done constantly. But diagnosing problems in SEO is mostly a technical issue.

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from TimDineen 2309 Days ago #
Votes: 0

@emanuelh - you should take it to heart that only two people agreed with you on the Sphinn discussion you point to.  Well, that’s two people that sphunn the discussion anyway.  Whether they agreed with you are not we don’t know.  Congrats on the nine years of doing SEO without need for tech skills!

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from estesce 2309 Days ago #
Votes: 0

I have a solid background in all things IT and 2 years ago got into SEO.  I have found that the knowledge of tech has benifitted me more than design elements.  That would have to be my weakest link. Most design work is easy chaning a color here or there making a new jpg file or gif isn’t that hard.  What makes the design part hard is the knowing how it all fits together to make a good design.  I belive most poeple can in fact do most everything (I can!!!) but how well is the problem.  I can consult, point, direct, and manage all in the right direction.  I would say the job is 75% SEO 20% client relations and 5% everything else from my experience. 

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from emanuelh 2309 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Replies.To TheMadHat:SEO... a combination of technical knowledge and marketing knowledge - Both in my article Is SEO A Technical Profession? (http://sphinn.com/story/18731) and in my comments I focus on the technical limits of SEO and ignore its marketing aspects. I demonstrate that what these limits allow is very little technical of nature, unless you consider decision-making in conditions of minimal information a technical practice.To St0n3y:a. Web design is technical and creative. I see no contradiction here, on the contrary - web design develops thanks to the creativity of web designers. However, it is technical in the sense that you can write down a set of instructions (an algorithm) for building a website as the manufacturer’s engineer writes down a set of instructions for servicing your car every 5,000 miles. (But you cannot write instructions for building a beautiful website though.)b. SEO is no different. It must balance both technical and creative. I surely agree. I work in an engineering firm and nine years ago my task was to turn its activity to 100% SEO. A few years later I started developing tools for SEO in highly competitive arenas. So, probably more than the average SEO worker, I am more sensitive to the limits of what can be done technically.c. But diagnosing problems in SEO is mostly a technical issue. Not at all. I can do everything I know to optimize better my website (within the allocated budget) and after six months it may still be at # 11 for the targeted search query. Examining the Top 10 websites I may find that all their visible qualities (number of links, age, PR, etc.) are poorer than mine. Obviously their superior relevance score must be accredited to their hidden qualities (value of each link, Trust Rank and qualities I have no idea about). Or else, for six months they have been gaining relevance score at a pace higher than mine. Or I’ve been using an SEO technique that was once beneficial and now lowers my site’s relevance score. But, since the actual relevance scores are hidden values, I cannot perform a technical analysis. The problem is lack of knowledge and you cannot solve it by as if it were technical.To TimDineen: a. you should take it to heart that only two people agreed with you - Well, if I’ll try to explain the intricacies of quantum mechanics to a group of even intelligent people most of them will think I’m crazy. It took me writing daily for six months in the most popular Israeli SEO forum till people started using the term relevance score (which merely defines the output of the ranking algorithm) and thinking quantitatively as I propose.b. It may be thanks to my superior technical skills that I’m the only one in the SEO community able so far to diagnose the technical limits of SEO practice.To estesce:I view website design and SEO as two separate and, in their spirit, even contradictory professions. Good design that doesn’t interfere with SEO is of course a prerequisite for SEO.  

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from kimber 2308 Days ago #
Votes: 0

"Google search on this candidates name, (if you cannot find them, that’s a red flag)."seems like a no-brainer to me, but i’m glad to see it on your list. apparently it’s not so much of a no-brainer to everyone hiring seos.and i am extremely confused about seo <i>not</i> being technical. that’s seems quite ridiculous. the majority of my daily seo tasks involve technical knowledge for sure. i’d hate to be the one to train a new seo hire with no technical experience / knowledge.

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from emanuelh 2308 Days ago #
Votes: 0

kimber writes: i am extremely confused about seo not being technical... the majority of my daily seo tasks involve technical knowledge for sureThe term technical is used in such a variety of meanings that it’s no wonder they cause confusion. For instance, I was quite surprised to read that social workers refer to what they do as technology. So let me explain the meaning I use:1. A technical discipline consists in a body of knowledge and of one or more sets of rules for the practice of the discipline. A good example is the set of instructions (algorithm) by which the mechanic performs service to your car every 5,000 miles. 2. I distinguish therefore between website design and development which is a technical discipline and SEO which has to do only with pushing web pages towards top rankings in SERPs. SEO cannot be a technical discipline because the body of knowledge is minimal (closer to 0% than to 50%) and the rest is hidden from the practitioners. Consequently any set of instructions is based in large part on guesswork even though it might have brought success to another web page before.3. The fact that many freelancers and firms practice both does not resolve neither the distinction nor the contradiction. In fact, when SEO workers have to modify website design work it is only because the website designer’s work is incomplete or poor.

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from emanuelh 2308 Days ago #
Votes: 0

- continued -I’ve been thinking of a discipline or practice that has absolutely no technical aspects and I couldn’t find one - even the practice of philosophy has some quite technical aspects. Not to mention formal logic, which, because it’s so technical is considered to be more of a branch of mathematics than of philosophy. Perhaps daydreaming. But even though it is a practice it has not yet matured into a discipline. On the other hand, some people believe that I’m a computer specialist simply because I work on a PC all day. Thinking of it, medicine was for centuries at least as technical as it is today even though it advocated a single technique - bloodletting - for all ailments. So is "technicality" a matter of degree?. Let me try again:1a. A technical discipline consists in a body of knowledge and of one or more sets of rules for the practice of the discipline. A good example is the set of instructions (algorithm) by which the mechanic performs service to your car every 5,000 miles.1b. In a mature technical discipline the performance of its sets of rules will bring, with a satisfactory probability, the prescribed (and rationally desired) results. So if you don’t often get the desired results you can question the maturity of the discipline.1c. SEO is an achievement-oriented practice, directed towards the definite goal of top rankings on SERPs. The client (or your inner self if you own the site) doesn’t tell you "fix my site" but "bring it to the top". Even though, in a highly competitive arena, hundreds of "SEO experts" perform the same set of rules designed to achieve the goal of say, ranking in the Top 10, most of them must fail. And if they perform different sets of rules the ten winners may be different but the number of losers will be the same.

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from Kamau 2307 Days ago #
Votes: 0

In My Opinion:The notion that web design is art + tech is seriously flawed. If we consider what a businessowner’s expectations are when spending hard cash for a website, our discussion misses the point entirely.The ease of generating web pages in Dreamweaver enabled tens of thousands of artists and technicians to manufacture and sell less-than-business-grade websites to businesses who thought they were investing in something that would further their business goals. In the end, most were disappointed. When a web designer gets more business mileage out of the website s/he produced than the actual client does-- the question answers itself. Design and tech are secondary-- Form Follows Function.That’s why, in the SEO industry, some of the first things that typically need to be done are to UN-do unnecessary (design portfolio) Flash, move Jscript, meaningless link text, etc., on the pages, AND THEN, construct a logical information architecture underneath.I think emmanuelh is correct in stressing the marketing aspect-- or at least the limits of tech-- especially with regards to his own company experience. The thing, I think, that may have gotten lost in the mix is that his skill could only make an impact because he first understood the industry, the company’s place within the industry, and both the marketing objectivesand business imperatives of the company he was contracted to serve.Only then can tech skills be employed in a way that justifies the client’s investment. If itdoesn’t fulfill those objectives, it’s an expense. The 55 SEO Questions don’t address this.While they might be nice on a basic industry certification exam, in the marketplace they do very little. Any good charlatan will just research and memorize the answers -- just like theymemorized, say, SEO Made Easy. Then we’re back to square one.I think clients would rather pay "experts who have no lives" to be concerned with Matt Cuttsso they can have more time to worry about Brett Farve and whatever-his-name-is whoquarterbacks the Patriots. Right now, they have no standardized way of determining who’s who. Maybe we can do more tofacilitate this.

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from seanmag 2298 Days ago #
Votes: 0

emanuel said:c. But diagnosing problems in SEO is mostly a technical issue. Not at all. I can do everything I know to optimize better my website (within the allocated budget) and after six months it may still be at # 11 for the targeted search query. Examining the Top 10 websites I may find that all their visible qualities (number of links, age, PR, etc.) are poorer than mine. Obviously their superior relevance score must be accredited to their hidden qualities (value of each link, Trust Rank and qualities I have no idea about). Or else, for six months they have been gaining relevance score at a pace higher than mine. Or I’ve been using an SEO technique that was once beneficial and now lowers my site’s relevance score. But, since the actual relevance scores are hidden values, I cannot perform a technical analysis. The problem is lack of knowledge and you cannot solve it by as if it were technical.@emaunelI’m amused at this soapbox you have jumped on to tout what you seem to think is this profound insight that you have, in suggesting that SEO is not a technical profession.  I’ve seen your similar comments now in several threads.First, you are stuck on the semantics that your black and white view of the world limits you to.Second, SEO is a profession that combines common sense, logic, technical knowledge, marketing savvy, psychology, etc.  Even the most scientific of subjects and professions typically includes an abundance of THEORY.  The best SEO’s understand this and based on their collective experience and results, they make decisions based on theories.  The metrics and results upon which they draw their conclusions evolves as a result of many variables; not the least of which is the evolution of the search engine’s algorithm.  Nevertheless, they are able to effectively use scientific data to draw logical, likely and general (not definitive), conclusions.  If you are suggesting that because one can not draw definitive conclusions that it means that it is non-technical or non-scientific, well then - let’s check your definitions of these words.Technical - "Belonging or pertaining to an art, science, or the like: technical skill."Science - "A branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws"Did you notice the word "general" in there?SEO is as much a  technical and scientific pursuit as it is a marketing pursuit and it is one that requires constant testing and re-testing to refine one’s theories.You seem like an intelligent enough sort.  Can you somehow move beyond this soapbox and start sharing some other insight?  It’s getting old, tired and predictable.  Maybe you should change your own algortihm.  On a final note, if your response above in paragraph c is true, then I would suggest you haven’t a clue what you are doing and should perhaps move on to another profession.  Or, if you are going to continue arguing the semantics based on the case you’ve presented - give me an example of where you found this to be true.  Although very unlikely you can, even if you could, it still doesn’t suggest that one can not draw relatively accurate conclusions overall.  If your case above exists (and I am not suiggesting that it can’t), is largely an anomaly; and what’s more - based on your experience - you know this statement to be true - technically speaking.Cheers, Sean

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from emanuelh 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Sean, please let me ignore your remarks on my psychological complexes and get to the point. 1. You wrote: ...SEO is a profession that combines common sense, logic, technical knowledge, marketing savvy, psychology, etc.  The same could be said of any profession and, with marketing savvy better left out, even of philosophy. But since you’ve mentioned it, I would like to add that SEO, unlike any other profession I can think of at this moment, also combines the pretension that one could be a high-tech specialist without any test of intellectual competence, not to mention acceptable academic credentials. 2. ...If you are suggesting that because one can not draw definitive conclusions that it means that it is non-technical or non-scientific, well then - let’s check your definitions of these words.Technical - "Belonging or pertaining to an art, science, or the like: technical skill."I don’t know with whom you argue here. Not with me certainly. I took great care to ignore Wikipedia’s definitions because they only help confuse the issue, and proposed in one of the posts above a very technical definition of what is a technical discipline within the limits of this particular debate: A technical discipline consists in a body of knowledge and of one or more sets of rules for the practice of the discipline. A good example is the set of instructions (algorithm) by which the mechanic performs service to your car every 5,000 miles... SEO cannot be a technical discipline because the body of knowledge is minimal (closer to 0% than to 50%) and the rest is hidden from the practitioners. Be so kind, read it and, if necessary, revise your comments.3.  On a final note, if your response above in paragraph c is true, then I would suggest you haven’t a clue what you are doing and should perhaps move on to another profession.  Or, if you are going to continue arguing the semantics based on the case you’ve presented - give me an example of where you found this to be true. Although very unlikely you can, even if you could, it still doesn’t suggest that one can not draw relatively accurate conclusions overall.  If your case above exists (and I am not suiggesting that it can’t), is largely an anomaly; and what’s more - based on your experience - you know this statement to be true - technically speaking.I believe that you refer to the situation I’ve described above as ...Examining the Top 10 websites I may find that all their visible qualities (number of links, age, PR, etc.) are poorer than mine (at # 11). Obviously their superior relevance score must be accredited to their hidden qualities (value of each link, Trust Rank and qualities I have no idea about)... Although such a case (all their visible qualities are poorer) is rare indeed, and I’ve brought it to illustrate the argument, it is nevertheless true that in the top 10 listings of most SERPs web pages with poorer qualities, by more than one variable, are often listed above web pages with superior qualities.I am surprised that you are surprised. Because you write: The best SEO’s understand this and based on their collective experience and results, they make decisions based on theories.  The metrics and results upon which they draw their conclusions evolves as a result of many variables; not the least of which is the evolution of the search engine’s algorithm. Nevertheless, they are able to effectively use scientific data to draw logical, likely and general (not definitive), conclusions. From which I understood that you are in frequent acquaintance with the most common data SEO workers look to for estimating competitiveness and writing price quotes.

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from seanmag 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

@emanuel I wrote: ...SEO is a profession that combines common sense, logic, technical knowledge, marketing savvy, psychology, etc. You responded..."The same could be said of any profession and, with marketing savvy better left out, even of philosophy."If I understand correctly, you’ve gone from insisting that SEO is not a technical discipline to stating that it requires technical knowledge (as does any profession according to you), but is not a technical discipline. Is that correct?Even in your own self-contrived definition, created I suspect as a means to support your argument, you state: "...body of knowledge and of one or more sets of rules...", as the parameters that define "technical discipline".Are you not familiar with "Google Webmaster Guideline"? Have you never read SEOBook, or any other authoritative text on the discipline of SEO?  Even forgetting about SEOBook (a significant body of knowledge), would you really not consider Google’s Guidelines as some sort of a set of rules? Is it just that you must know the entire search algorithm in order to be able to possibly categorize SEO as a potentially technical discipline - depending upon how it is practiced?If you were an astronomer would you need to know every fact of the universe from the beginning in order to consider any associated practice a technical or scientific discipline?BTW - They were Webster’s Dictionary definitions, but then, who uses that unreliable source anymore.

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from emanuelh 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Sean, Let me quote from what I wrote above: So is "technicality" a matter of degree?... 1a. A technical discipline consists in a body of knowledge and of one or more sets of rules for the practice of the discipline. A good example is the set of instructions (algorithm) by which the mechanic performs service to your car every 5,000 miles.1b. In a mature technical discipline the performance of its sets of rules will bring, with a satisfactory probability, the prescribed (and rationally desired) results. So if you don’t often get the desired results you can question the maturity of the discipline....SEO cannot be a technical discipline because the body of knowledge is minimal (closer to 0% than to 50%) and the rest is hidden from the practitioners. Consequently any set of instructions is based in large part on guesswork even though it might have brought success to another web page before...Perhaps I’ve misunderstood what you mean by SEO combines... technical knowledge. There is of course a lot of technical knowledge I use while doing SEO, but technical knowledge is not the essence of SEO as it is the essence of what the mechanic does to your car while servicing it every 5,000 miles.Actually, when I started doing SEO about nine years ago it seemed to be to me a purely technical matter, and to a very large degree it really was. There were some simple rules how to "fix" a site (keywords in metatags and text), to make it show higher in search results. But there were obviously no rules for how to make it show highest. That obviously depended on what the competitors are doing. So I had to guide our growing staff to think in terms of military field intelligence, something every Israeli has a pretty good idea what it means, too often in terms of a personally experienced result of failure.Naturally, what the competitors are doing is measured by the search engines and summed up in the consolidated relevance score of their pages. If it’s worth more than what I’m doing they’ll rank above me, and if its worth most they’ll be in the prized Top 10 who get all the cream and not me. But Google won’t show me the actual relevance scores, only their descending order. And the algorithm too became more and more complex as its fine details became obscure and frequently modified. The model of field intelligence was not helpful any more. Especially since the only data we could collect and process was not very helpful. For instance, in most SERPs pages with superior qualities were very often ranked below pages with inferior qualities, clear evidence that we are missing critical information. (And by this I reply to one of your objections.) The working environment has begun to resemble systems best described by the theory of complex systems. You ask me whether I’ve read SEOBook, or any other authoritative text on the discipline of SEO? My friend, I’ve written the authoritative text on the discipline of SEO! Though, while I was in the technical stage and even later, in the field intelligence stage, every new chapter was soon copied down from our website and pasted into the sites of other SEO’s, and then there were copies of the copies. But when I had no choice but starting thinking in terms of the theory of complex systems it became too difficult to turn what I know into the sales pitch of a website. I say that the amount of information SEO workers can get access to (the details of the algorithm and its output of relevance scores)  is minimal (closer to 0% than to 50%, and I’d bet on a few percent), and therefore SEO cannot be performed as in the practice of a technical discipline (which despite some uncertainties still has access to a lot of information, that is, closer to 100% than to 50%).And, by the way, "Google’s Webmaster Guidelines" tell you what to avoid but don’t tell you how to be # 1 in Google. This was my last point:1c. SEO is an achievement-oriented practice, directed towards the definite goal of top rankings on SERPs. The client (or your inner self if you own the site) doesn’t tell you "fix my site" but "bring it to the top". Even though, in a highly competitive arena, hundreds of "SEO experts" perform the same set of rules designed to achieve the goal of say, ranking in the Top 10, most of them must fail. And if they perform different sets of rules the ten winners may be different but the number of losers will be the same.   

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from seanmag 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Emanuel,While I certainly don’t agree with all of your semantics, I do enjoy arguing with you. Unfortunately, I’m out of pocket, so won’t be able to repsond to your above statements in kind.The one thing I will address though, is your last statement:Even though, in a highly competitive arena, hundreds of "SEO experts" perform the same set of rules designed to achieve the goal of say, ranking in the Top 10, most of them must fail. And if they perform different sets of rules the ten winners may be different but the number of losers will be the same.   I think this statement speaks directly to the core of my argument with you.  Everything you state seems to need to fit into the very neat categories of black and white - with no shades of gray.There seems no room for "SEO is a discipline that can be technical in nature", "In the proper application of SEO, regardless of the extent of the competition, there will always be varying degrees of success".  Rather - it’s "Not a technical discipline", "Most of them must fail".These definitives are simply not true.  The realities are shades of gray.  Long tail keywords, for example, provide that there can be many winners, just as much as multiple search engines with varied algorithms and multiple SERPs do the same.  There are not a precious few that win, while most MUST FAIL.  To the educated and dedicated practioner, there is room for considerable and varying degrees of success - or winning.  Perhaps a relevant metaphor is the pursuit of success in athletics.  You may not win every game - but you win and lose some.  The best hitters in baseball achieve success only 30% of the time.  Yet - they are considered very successful.  Winners change everyday - this is life.  SEO is much the same - the level of success changes and just as in any endeavor where there are outside influences in which you have varying degrees of control, you cannot guarantee the result with absolute specificity.  I’m not sure that I know of an endeavor where you can.You of all people (if you truly wrote the authoritative text), should know and embrace that in SEO, there is just as much room for winners as there are variables to generating results.If you’re looking for a game where you can be guaranteed definitive results (i.e. get me to the number on position on the term Viagra, and keep me there for eternity), well then - this is certainly not the profession you should remain in.  Because as we both know - this will never happen.  However - it doesn’t mean you can’t attain a level of success through the technical application of principles, using the large body of knowledge and published sets of rules that help you to succeed.

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from neyne 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

sometimes it seems like the argument is the purpose of this whole exercise and not the understanding or, god forbid, benefiting your clients. and if the only way you can benefit them is by bringing them from #11 to #10 for a competitive keyword, then there should be a new name invented for this discipline. Search Engine Nitpicking. Search Engine Pinpointing. Search Engine Narrowization. Whatever...Too much discussion, too little practice.

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from emanuelh 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Yes neyne, thought experiments are sometimes as tiresome, repetitive and pinpointed on a single variable like true experiments in the laboratory. Moreover, in thought experiments  discussion is the practice. The focus on #11 to #10 serves well to lift the fog spread by bragging about the success of improving the ranking of a page from # 200 to # 31 with zero improvement in sales.

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from Halfdeck 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

All I’m gonna say (I didn’t read this thread) is that the 55 questions are all no brainers, and even if a guy knew all the answers to those questions, if that’s all he knew, he’s not getting hired, at least not by me (not that I’m hiring), because you don’t need to know the difference between TBPR and PageRank to be able to negotiate a killer deal that gets you 1,00 editorial .edu links, for instance. Who do you email? Which .edu domain? What type of content will help get your foot in the door? That information isn’t published anywhere - you either know it or you don’t.When it comes to diagnosing problems, no one in this industry is an expert - some are just better at guessing than others.

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from emanuelh 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Sean,You discuss with me as if it were a political issue, mixing though and feelings, and not a conceptual issue that requires precise definitions. (I wouldn’t call it scientific, out of deep respect to science.) But believe me, gray is not missing from my color spectrum. By a highly competitive arena I mean the top SERP (or top SERPs if its visitors tend to go deeper than the Top 10 results) for a given search query. A different search query is a different arenas. Arenas are thus determined by SE users but the relative competitiveness of each is determined by what the web page owners, or whoever acts on their behalf are doing. Suppose you’re # 11 in five arenas and you want to know where to spend the next monthly budget. One possible move would be to choose the arena in which the page now at # 10 has the lowest relevance score.Since in most arenas traffic is concentrated diferentially and almost 100% go to the Top 10 sites, this is the goal of SEO projects, as opposed to other SEM marketing projects that may take place simultaneously. If one hundred SEO workers, servicing a hundred competing websites, target the same five arenas it is obvious that only ten at most can show success and ninety or more must fail. The cause of failure would not necessarily be poor competence (after all, in the most competitive arenas it is the most competent SEO firms that try and fail) but things like insufficient budget.I’ve discussed the "long-tail search queries" issue with neyne a few weeks ago. There are two conceptual models and it is not obvious at all which would be the more successful one:1. Optimize the page for the short list of head search queries (i.e. blue widgets), and copy into the page a full English thesaurus.2. Optimize the page only for the short list of head search queries, but increase their relevance scores as high as necessary (that is higher than what is necessary to get # 1 rankings for the heads) to get # 1 rankings for every imaginable long-tail search query.The second model is based on the untested assumption that for a given long-tail search query (without double quotes) Google does not have to find the extra words within the page or in the anchor text of inbound links and it will rank higher pages that have higher relevance scores for the head words only.          

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from neyne 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

"Yes neyne, thought experiments are sometimes as tiresome, repetitive and pinpointed on a single variable like true experiments in the laboratory. Moreover, in thought experiments  discussion is the practice. The focus on #11 to #10 serves well to lift the fog spread by bragging about the success of improving the ranking of a page from # 200 to # 31 with zero improvement in sales."so what was your thought conversion last month ? how many thought customers have achieved top thought locations ? I suggest a new topic: "Is SEO a thought profession?"The focus on #11 to #10 serves as a distraction from dealing with real issues - how to increase the amount of relevant trafic to client’s website. How to improve the conversion rate. How to succesfully manage customer’s online presence. How to increase the social media presence and conversion rate. How to increase the amount of time each visitor spends on client’s website. How to minimize client’s dependance on SE traffic. How to leverage internet branding achieved through search engines and social media in the offline world. All those things SEM has evolved into while technicians were obsessed with this #11 to #10 issue.

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from emanuelh 2297 Days ago #
Votes: 0

neyne, Search Engine Marketing has indeed evolved a lot. A few years ago almost all of it was SEO (that is, getting top rankings in the organic results) and now you have PPC and the social web, and the task of increasing the conversion rate of the same traffic volume is so much more sophisticated. No wonder I have to specialize too and focus my humble abilities on a single task. Do you question my choice?   

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from neyne 2296 Days ago #
Votes: 0

not at all. Neither do I question your abilities. I don’t even question your thought experiments. The only thing I question, no wait, I protest is the fact that you are treating these thought experiments a) without any self criticism, b) relating to whoever does not engage in the theoretical acrobatics as being second-rate-technical-only-lying-to-customers kind of SEO. All the while these lowly individuals are helping their clients daily, getting good results, improving traffic volume and conversion without, gasp, focusing solely on how to bring a website from #11 to #10.And, yes, I know, none of them are able to answer the tricky lets-assume-100-seos-are-competing-for-the-same-10-positions-and-they-all-have-similar-relevance-scores- who-gets-to-be-in-the-top-10-if-they-do-something-are-they-improving-location-or-are-others-doing-more-of-it-and-thus  -decreasing-their-locations kind of question. What I question is your insisting on cruciality of these questions to everyday SEO work. No, these questions are not so important. A lot of people are doing pretty well without answering them...

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from emanuelh 2296 Days ago #
Votes: 0

neyne, I can even help you with an argument against me - it is not crucial to reflect daily on the profound subtleties of SEO. After all, and thanks to the Sisyphean work of all those individuals in the ranks, there are always ten pages in the Top 10! 

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