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Twitter is just the latest site to have drank the nofollow kool-aid. Sebastian covers it, with a bit of a surprise twist at the end. With guest appearances (in discussion at least) by Graywolf, Matt Cutts, and Harith.
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Avatar Moderator
from Sebastian 3517 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Selfish sphunn ;) Thanks for the nice introduction John :)

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from Harith 3517 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Thanks John and Sebastian. Some food for the thought, indeed! I believe that Betty Cutts Humanitarian Organization site http://www.blessing-hands.org and her blog http://blessinghands.blogspot.com deserve all the link juice available on this planet!

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from tamar 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 1

I actually found this via Scobleizer’s shared feed. Pretty cool that he has Sphinn added there. :) (Now back to your regular scheduled program.)

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from asnider 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 1

This sucks, for SEO purposes, but I think that Twitter still has some use as a marketing tool (though, it’s been diminished by this development). It’s still yet another channel for engaging your customers, so hopefully, it will continue to drive traffic, even if it doesn’t boost your placement in the SERPs.

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from tamar 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 1

To be honest, since Twitter converted URLs 95% of the time to tinyurl.com or urltea.com, I don’t think there’s anything to be overly concerned about.

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from JohnWeb 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 0

The tinyurl’s are actually 301 redirects so some link juice may have been passed, though obviously no anchor text, not that using twitter for an seo strategy is a good long term plan. I think the point I like most is that the nofollow attitude is like a plaque started by Google. It’s taken a while for it to sink in but now it’s just showing up everywhere sometimes for no reason at all. What started out slowly as a way to curb comment spam has mutated into a misguided attempt at affecting search engine rankings by its use. Ironic at best, and probably not what they had in mind when it was thought of. I still can forsee a day when too much nofollow is considered spam, http://sphinn.com/story.php?id=1339 ,and a whole host of webmasters will be standing there wondering what they did wrong. Too much of a good thing can be bad.

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from tamar 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Yeah, I hear you. Thus, it makes sense for Twitter to do this, but it would be nicer for them to do it on a per-user basis (especially those who spam their website across every. single. Twit).

Avatar Moderator
from Sebastian 3516 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Sensible and selective use of rel-nofollow is not a bad thing, although not even all teams at Google understand its semantics, hence trow it like confetti. Bad is the ongoing clueless and ignorant mentality "apply nofollow to please Google", whether it’s the right thing to do in a particular use case or not. Mostly rel-nofollow is not a (the) solution, but its cushy for dummies. It was not even meant as a solution for anything, and it evolved to a hapless microformat getting abused more and more. About time to trash it in favour of a not that misleading and confusing mechanism.

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from Halfdeck 3515 Days ago #
Votes: 1

A blanket-nofollow-bomb will always cause collateral damage. Social media sites have yet to figure out a way to selectively nofollow in a scalable way. Blaming Google for the nofollow-craze, though, is boring.

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from JohnWeb 3515 Days ago #
Votes: 0

Half, If yahoo pushed nofollow instead of Google do you think it would have caught on?

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from AndyBeard 3515 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Sphunn and linked :) What they needed to do was to nofollow the blogroll links thus preventing the friend spammers building up PR5 and PR6 twitter accounts.

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from Halfdeck 3514 Days ago #
Votes: 1

"If yahoo pushed nofollow instead of Google do you think it would have caught on?" Nope. Still, the blame game is a tired cliche. Webmasters are also to blame; from one side of their mouths they bad-mouth nofollow yet take a look at their sites most of their comments are nofollowed. So SEO bloggers can nofollow their comments but twitter can’t nofollow their user-generated links. Sounds hypocritical to me. Either be for or against, but no, most people are riding the fence. Who are the fense riders? wolf-howl.com seomoz.org johnon.com sebastianx.blogspot.com Dont get me wrong, I like all these guys, but let’s accept the fact that while Sebastian blogs about Twitter nofollowing links, comments on his own site are nofollowed. Don’t like nofollow? Stop using it. If everybody stopped using nofollow Google will have no leverage to enforce nofollow. But for some that would be bad -- it would mean they’d have to pass link juice every time they linked to Wikipedia. Nofollow is an imperfect, temporary patch that paves the way for link sellers to not only lose the ability to pass link juice but to be penalized for bad behavior. But the underlying motive for all the bitching is simple: Google is taking away another toy we had to manipulate search results. It’s like bitching that a bank installed a new metal detector so its harder for me to rob. What does a bank robber to do? Bitch to the bank manager about too much securty or figure out another way to rob it blind?

Avatar Moderator
from Sebastian 3514 Days ago #
Votes: 1

I’ll figure out another way to rob it blind eventually :) To my defense ... Google inserts the crappy nofollows on my blog. I agree that’s evil, but fighting the evil monster from inside the system might have advantages, at least until the threshold of my ability to endure duress is reached.

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