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The recent fake-news-story-as-successful-link-bait event and the surrounding firestorm has bugged me and had me thinking, which is dangerous when I’m supposed to be on vacation. Yet here I am with my laptop. The concept I can’t get off my mind is this notion of "trusted links" and "truthiness". Is one fake news story any different than the thousands of press releases put out daily that are that are filled with hype masquerading as news?
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from Kimota 2327 Days ago #
Votes: 0

I think I have to pop my $0.02 in here.In saying that the trust lies with the linkers rather than the linkbait, a lot is assumed. If lazy journalists link to a fake story, their links are not given less weight than a reputable librarian - following the example given. In fact, as newspaper websites often have higher PR and authority, the opposite is often the case. The average Google user is not looking at the ’trustworthiness’ of the links leading to a site when they click on a Google result - they click on it because it ranks high.Also, as I’ve mentioned elsewhere, there is a big difference between marketing spin and fake news. Although marketers may choose careful wording to present the most positive view, there are very strict laws about truth in advertising that clearly prohibits wilfull deceit or misleading behaviour.

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from AlanCh 2327 Days ago #
Votes: 1

Inventing a ’news’ story is totally unacceptable - certainly unethical - but ’creating’ news for the sake of PR is not only normal but often ’good’ marketing. GoldenPalace.com’s purchase of William Shatner’s kidney stone, for example. Did they do it for the charity concerned [doubtful], to be able to display said stone in their casino [hmmm?] or was it for a mention - and link - in an untold number of blogs and news sites around the globe?That said, I’m still with you in that strategically, quality links from quality sites is the way to go.

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from Halfdeck 2326 Days ago #
Votes: 0

I agree with Eric completely. It’s interesting how some people equate the word trust with websites or links, when the word - at least from Google’s POV - has to do more with the person who controls the website. Like the criminal system, Google keeps track of your online "criminal" record and will use it to judge your next step. If a website is "trusted" its not necessarily because it is authoritative; its far more important that the site doesn’t have a known history of link "abuse" (cross linking, link swaps, link sales, etc).I also see no difference between a fake story and marketing with a huge-ol’ spin. By saying that, I don’t think Eric is justifying the fake story; instead he is just coloring them black with the same brush. At least that’s how I read this post.

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from iBrian 2326 Days ago #
Votes: 0

"Inventing a ’news’ story is totally unacceptable - certainly unethical - but ’creating’ news for the sake of PR is not only normal but often ’good’ marketing. "I can only presume you don’t subscribe to many PR feeds? :)Spin is spin is spin. It’s an editorial decision as to whether a story is newsworthy or not. It doesn’t matter whether a story is fake, lame, or plain inaccurate - failure of editorial controls are simply that.

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from g1smd 2325 Days ago #
Votes: 0

So, no difference between talking up something that actually happened, and writing about something that never happened at all, and pretending it is real?Really?i don’t think so. But it was not the story, per se, that was the problem in the end, it was the gaming of the system for links.

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from iBrian 2325 Days ago #
Votes: 0

What I mean is that editors are gatekeepers who are supposed to ensure accuracy in the first place.It doesn’t matter whether the story was engineered to be fake, is untentionally incorrect, or just poor - editorial controls are supposed to stop it going anywhere in the first place.That chimes with Eric’s piece - strong and reliable editorial controls should translate into trust for the readers, which could translate as trust for the search engines.2c.

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from SEOGuy4U 2283 Days ago #
Votes: 0

If our marketing was strictly limited to links and search engines then perhaps you would have a point.  However in today’s Web 2.0 world such is not the case.  While we can indeed "fool" the search engines our viewers will never leave with a good taste in their mouths if they believe they have been "made the fool."  Therefore delivering relevant timely well written contet is critical to our success on the web as well as our reputations on Social bookmarking and networking websites.Here is an article that goes into these issues even more.===> http://search-engine-optimization-and-beyond.com/A-Audios/single/SevenSmartWa.htmThere are of course those black hatters and old wayers who would disagree with me, but as they say "the proof is in the pudding."

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from DarkMatter 2283 Days ago #
Votes: 0

by the time these bogus stories get exposed, they’ve already gotten thousands of links. most of the people who link to it will not find out that it was a fake story or will not bother removing the link. so, as distasteful as it is, you have to acknowledge that this is an effective link building technique at the very least.

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